How Chinese Activists Are “Traveled” or “Mentally Illed”

A pair of essays this week illustrates different parts of the spectrum of methods with which Chinese authorities deal with perceived troublemakers. At The New Yorker, ​Jianying Zha explains the strange phenomenon of “bèi lǚyóu” (被旅游), or “being traveled”: the superficially benign practice of sending people on often lavish but closely supervised vacations to remove them from sensitive areas at sensitive times. This examination frames a profile of Zha’s brother, democracy activist Zha Jianguo, and Read More …

Third Canadian Reportedly Detained in China

A third Canadian, whose name has not yet been revealed, has reportedly been detained in China, according to Canada’s Global Affairs office. On December 10, two Canadian citizens, Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, had been separately detained in Beijing and Liaoning, respectively. The Chinese government later announced that both were being held on suspicion of “harming national security,” though many believe their detentions are related to Canada’s arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou, who is Read More …

Will Thailand protect Hakeem Al-Araibi?

19 Dec Will Thailand protect Hakeem Al-Araibi? 19.12.18 | [Caroline Stover is a lawyer focusing on human rights law and refugee law in Southeast Asia.]  Mr. Hakeem Al-Araibi, a Bahraini footballer, dissident, refugee, and Australian legal permanent resident, has been detained in Bangkok since late last month, as Thailand considers whether it will send Mr. Al-Araibi back to Bahrain, or allow him to return to Australia. If returned, Mr. Al-Araibi is at risk of torture Read More …

Will Thailand protect Hakeem Al-Araibi?

19 Dec Will Thailand protect Hakeem Al-Araibi? 19.12.18 | [Caroline Stover is a lawyer focusing on human rights law and refugee law in Southeast Asia.]  Mr. Hakeem Al-Araibi, a Bahraini footballer, dissident, refugee, and Australian legal permanent resident, has been detained in Bangkok since late last month, as Thailand considers whether it will send Mr. Al-Araibi back to Bahrain, or allow him to return to Australia. If returned, Mr. Al-Araibi is at risk of torture Read More …

Google Steps Back from China; McKinsey in Deep

In August The Intercept’s Ryan Gallagher revealed that Google had been working in secret on a search engine with censorship and surveillance capabilities aimed at allowing it to operate under China’s strict internet controls. “Project Dragonfly” prompted a fierce backlash both within the company and beyond. Now, Gallagher reports that the project has “effectively ended,” citing two sources within the company and the abandonment of a market research “honeypot” used to harvest Chinese users’ search Read More …